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Title I - Basic State Grants

Title I provides the basic assistance and the major share of funds, under Perkins IV, to states for career and technical education. Each year, Congress appropriates roughly $1.1 billion dollars in Title I funds.

  • State Allocations
  • Required Uses of Title I Funds
  • Distribution of Title I funds
  • Fact Sheets



  • Conducting an assessment of the career and technical education programs funded under Perkins IV.
  • Developing, improving, or expanding the use of technology in career and technical education.
  • Offering professional development programs at the secondary and postsecondary levels.
  • Integrating academics with career and technical education.
  • Providing preparation for non-traditional fields in current and emerging professions.
  • Supporting partnerships among local educational agencies, institutions of higher education, adult education providers, and other entities to enable students to achieve state academic standards, and career and technical skills, or complete career and technical programs of study.
  • Serving individuals in state institutions.
  • Providing support for programs for special populations that lead to high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand occupations.
  • Offering technical assistance for eligible recipients.

Title I grants are allotted to states through a formula that is based on the states' populations in certain age groups and per capita income.

States are then required to distribute not less than 85% of their Title I funds by formula to local education agencies, area vocational and technical schools, community colleges, and other public or private nonprofit institutions that offer career and technical education programs. Each state determines the split of funds to be distributed to recipients at the secondary and postsecondary level.

The state-level agency responsible for administering the Perkins grant may not spend more than:

  • 5% of its Title I funds on administrative activities described in the legislation.
  • 10% of its Title I funds on state leadership activities described in the legislation.

Similarly, local recipients may spend no more than 5% of their Title I funds on administrative activities.

A new provision under Perkins IV provides the option for each state to consolidate all, or a portion of, its Title II funds with its Title I funds and to use those consolidated funds for purposes described under Title I of the legislation. About 1/3 of all states have opted to do so.